(Updated on 7/24) Entry restrictions for foreigners to Taiwan in response to COVID-19 outbreak

Created:2020-07-24Data Source:Bureau Of Consular AffairsCounter:656342


July 24, 2020

Starting from July 26, travelers arriving in Taiwan from Philippines must undergo COVID-19 testing at airports and observe quarantine measures

 

On July 24, the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) reported that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) continues to rage in the Philippines. Furthermore, of 11 imported cases confirmed in Taiwan from June, six are linked to the Philippines. To protect public health, the CECC announced that starting from July 26, travelers arriving in Taiwan from the Philippines must follow related quarantine measures which are listed below.
1. Taiwanese nationals and certain foreign nationals (foreign nationals with an Alien Resident Certificate or a resident visa, migrant workers, foreign students, and foreign diplomats) must, whether they have symptoms or not, have their specimens collected at the airport upon entry into the country. Those who have symptoms shall be transported to a group quarantine facility to await test results; asymptomatic individuals shall undergo a 14-day period of home quarantine at home or at a quarantine hotel.
2. Foreign nationals without an Alien Resident Certificate must provide a certificate of a negative COVID-19 test result issued within three days of boarding before they are allowed to board their flight or their transit flight, or to enter Taiwan. Those who wish to enter Taiwan must also undergo home quarantine for 14 days after entry into the country.


July 22, 2020

Starting from August 1, Taiwan to conditionally allow foreign nationals to receive medical treatment in Taiwan

 

On July 22, the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) announced that international patients may, except for non-urgent medical care needs including health checkups, and aesthetic medicine, provide relevant documents to medical institutions to apply for receiving medical care in Taiwan starting from August 1. The Ministry of Health and Welfare (the MOHW) will make the final decision on applications after reviewing the necessity, continuity, and risk of the treatment for applicants, in a bid to ensure foreign nationals can receive medical care in Taiwan.

The CECC stated that foreign nationals who wish to visit Taiwan to receive medical care may apply to visit Taiwan with their spouse or first, second or third degree relative (2 companions in total); if necessary, they may apply to come with one healthcare worker or caregiver from the country they reside in apart from their family members. Required documents and information include the following: a health insurance certificate, an affidavit for mandatory quarantine, a health declaration document (an English certificate of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test result issued within three days of boarding), and a disease prevention plan and treatment plan issued by the medical institution treating the applicant. On behalf of the applicant, the medical institution in Taiwan shall apply to the MOHW for an entry permit for medical treatment. The applicant or the medical institution may go to the relevant authority or agency to apply for a special entry permit after obtaining the approval of the MOHW.

The CECC further explained that individuals who have obtained permission to come to Taiwan for medical care, and persons accompanying them, when checking in with the airline for the flight to Taiwan or before boarding, are required to provide an English certificate of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test result issued within three days of boarding. They must wear masks at all times during the flight. They must undergo a 14-day home quarantine period upon entry into the country and must also undergo COVID-19 testing after the home quarantine period ends. Those who test negative for COVID-19 may proceed to the medical institution for his/her medical treatment. However, those requiring urgent medical care may be admitted to a designated ward or negative pressure isolation ward in the medical institution which they originally planned to visit. They shall receive their planned medical treatment after one negative test result and be given care according to the standards for caring COVID-19 suspected cases during the 14 day quarantine. Regarding related fees, applicants shall be responsible for paying quarantine fees, COVID-19 testing fees, and medical consultation and treatment fees. The medical institution treating the applicant shall help the applicant implement required quarantine and testing measures, including booking a quarantine hotel, making advance preparations for transportation, and arranging his/her medical care.

The CECC emphasized that Taiwan would maintain its strict border control and has put disease prevention and management measures in place for foreign nationals applying to visit Taiwan for medical treatment in order to reduce the risk of community-acquired and nosocomial infection posed by inbound travelers and ensure the public health.

 


June 24, 2020

MOFA adjusts entry regulations for foreign nationals in response to worldwide efforts to resume economic activity and international exchanges following COVID-19 outbreak

As countries around the world are easing COVID-19 lockdown measures and resuming economic activity and international exchanges, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of China (Taiwan) will gradually adjust regulations concerning foreign nationals’ entry into Taiwan in accordance with decisions and standards set by the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC). These adjustments are being made to accelerate Taiwan’s economic momentum and restore normal living conditions. From June 29, 2020, foreign nationals who wish to travel to Taiwan for reasons other than tourism and regular social visits may apply for a special entry permit with an R.O.C. overseas mission by submitting relevant documents and forms. Applications by students and people wishing to study Mandarin in Taiwan will be handled by the Ministry of Education in line with its related measures.

Upon entering Taiwan, all foreign nationals must present an English-language certificate of a negative COVID-19 test taken within three days of boarding the flight to Taiwan and undergo a 14-day home quarantine period. Visitors of the following categories can be exempted from negative COVID-19 test:personnel on diplomatic or official business, migrant workers, and students (whose entry is managed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Labor, and Ministry of Education and who represent manageable risk levels), as well as people coming to Taiwan for emergency situations and crewmembers on vessels arriving in Taiwan (for whom it may be difficult to obtain a certificate of a negative COVID-19 test).

These newly announced regulations constitute updates of measures that were announced earlier this year by MOFA, according to which foreign nationals—except Alien Resident Certificate holders, personnel on diplomatic or official business, persons who can prove they are fulfilling commercial and contractual obligations, and persons requiring special permission—were barred from entering Taiwan from March 19 in accordance with guidance from the CECC. (E)

> FAQ: https://www.boca.gov.tw/cp-220-5691-aa1c3-2.html

 


June 15, 2020

Fourth automatic 30-day extension for foreigners entering Taiwan on or before March 21 with visa waiver, visitor visa, or landing visa (no application required) (overstayers excepted)


Due to the impact that COVID-19 border control measures and flight bans have had on foreign visitors to Taiwan, MOFA announced the first automatic 30-day visa extension on March 21, the second on April 17, and the third on May 18.

Although the pandemic has recently showed signs of abating, nations worldwide are still generally enforcing strict border controls and international airlines have yet to resume regular operations, making international travel difficult. In light of these conditions, MOFA announces that all travelers who entered Taiwan on or before March 21, 2020, on a visitor visa, a landing visa, or through a visa-waiver program and who have not overstayed their legal stay period will now be granted a fourth automatic 30-day extension (The duration of stay has thus been extended to 120 days in total). No application is required. The total period of stay cannot exceed 180 days. (The day after the entry date will be counted as the first day of stay). These conditions are subject to change and may be adjusted as circumstances require.

Foreigners who have already stayed in Taiwan for the maximum 180 days or those who have overstayed their visas should consult the National Immigration Agency website ( https://www.immigration.gov.tw/5475/ ). The website details the regulations for foreigners who meet specific criteria during the pandemic to apply for

special duration of stay extensions, as well as explaining the Expanded Overstayers Voluntary Departure Program and other measures.

> FAQ: https://www.boca.gov.tw/cp-220-5667-653c7-2.html
 


 

May 18, 2020

Third automatic 30-day extension for foreigners entering Taiwan on or before March 21 with visa waiver, visitor visa, or landing visa (no application required) (overstayers excepted)

 

Due to the impact that COVID-19 border control measures and flight bans have had on foreign visitors to Taiwan, MOFA announced the first automatic 30-day visa extension on March 21, and the second on April 17.

Although there are signs that the pandemic is abating, most global travel restrictions have yet to be lifted. In light of these conditions, MOFA announces that all travelers who entered Taiwan on or before March 21, 2020, on a visitor visa, a landing visa, or through a visa-waiver program and who have not overstayed their legal stay period will now be granted a third automatic 30-day extension (The duration of stay has thus been extended to 90 days in total). No application is required. The total period of stay cannot exceed 180 days. (The day after the entry date will be counted as the first day of stay). These conditions are subject to change and may be adjusted as circumstances require.

In addition, the National Immigration Agency (NIA) has announced the Expanded Overstayers Voluntary Departure Program. Foreign nationals who have overstayed their visas and turn themselves in from March 20 to June 30 are entitled to penalty relief measures: They will not be detained or receive an entry ban, and will be given only a minimum fine. For further information, please visit the NIA website at https://www.immigration.gov.tw/ .

>FAQ: https://www.boca.gov.tw/cp-220-5609-e00b6-2.html

 


Apr 17, 2020

Second automatic 30-day extension for foreigners entering Taiwan on or before March 21 with visa waiver, visitor visa, or landing visa (no application required) (overstayers excepted)

 

Due to the impact that COVID-19 border control measures and flight bans have had on foreign visitors to Taiwan, MOFA announced an automatic 30-day duration of stay period extension on March 21, 2020.

In consideration of increased travel restrictions worldwide, MOFA announces that all travelers who entered Taiwan on or before March 21, 2020, on a visitor visa, a landing visa, or through a visa-waiver program and who have not overstayed their legal stay period will now be granted a second automatic 30-day extension. No application is required. The total period of stay cannot exceed 180 days (The day after entry date will be counted as the first day of stay). These conditions are subject to change and may be adjusted as circumstances require.

In addition, the National Immigration Agency (NIA) has announced the Expanded Overstayers Voluntary Departure Program. Foreign nationals who have overstayed their visas and turn themselves in from March 20 to June 30 are entitled to penalty relief measures: They will not be detained or receive an entry ban, and will be given only a minimum fine. For further information, please visit the NIA website at https://www.immigration.gov.tw/.

>FAQ: https://www.boca.gov.tw/cp-220-5539-8930e-2.html

 


Mar 21, 2020

Automatic 30-day extension for foreigners entering Taiwan on or before March 21 with visa waiver, visitor visa, or landing visa (no application is required) (overstayers excepted)

 

1. In response to border control measures and flight bans implemented around the world to contain the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, MOFA announces that all travelers who entered Taiwan on or before March 21, 2020, on a visitor visa, a landing visa, or through a visa-waiver program and who have not overstayed their legal stay period will be granted an automatic 30-day extension. No application is required. The total period of stay cannot exceed 180 days. These conditions are subject to change and may be adjusted as circumstances require.

2. In addition, the National Immigration Agency (NIA) has announced the Expanded Overstayers Voluntary Departure Program. Foreign nationals who have overstayed their legal stay  period and turn themselves in from March 20 to June 30 are entitled to penalty relief measures: They will not be detained or receive an entry ban, and will be given only a minimum fine. For further information, please visit the NIA website at https://www.immigration.gov.tw/5475/5478/141457/142068/217277/

 


Mar 18, 2020   

★ IMPORTANT

Taiwan to bar foreign nationals from entering the country starting March 19 in response to the continued spread of COVID-19

 

1. Taiwan will bar foreign nationals whose flights depart after 00:00 Taipei Standard Time (GMT+8) on March 19 from entering the country in accordance with measures announced by the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC). Exemptions will be granted to Alien Resident Certificate holders, personnel on diplomatic or official business, persons who can prove they are fulfilling commercial and contractual obligations, and persons requiring special permission.

2. In accordance with CECC regulations, the exempted foreign nationals listed in the previous paragraph must observe a 14-day home quarantine upon arrival. Relevant government agencies shall be responsible for any necessary arrangements regarding their lodging, movements, and work venues in Taiwan.

Please refer to the website of the Ministry of Health and Welfare for regulations and details concerning the 14-day home quarantine: https://www.cdc.gov.tw/Category/MPage/V6Xe4EItDW3NdGTgC5PtKA

3. The aforementioned entry restrictions are subject to change depending on the development of the COVID-19 outbreak. Changes will be announced by the CECC.

4. Implementation details

4.1. Starting March 19, only the exempted foreign nationals listed above will be allowed entry into Taiwan. (Foreign nationals whose flights depart before 00:00 Taipei Standard Time (GMT+8) on March 19 will still be allowed entry, including those who transfer or transit through a third country.)

4.2. Foreign nationals who are eligible for visa-free entry or hold a visitor or resident visa and wish to enter Taiwan from March 19 must hold relevant documents to qualify for exempted status. These documents must be presented to the National Immigration Agency (NIA) personnel at the port of entry for approval. Those holding special entry permits issued by R.O.C. (Taiwan) overseas missions, valid Alien Resident Certificates, or MOFA ID Cards will be allowed entry following inspection by NIA personnel.

4.3. Foreign nationals unable to determine whether their documents meet the criteria for exempted status may visit an R.O.C. (Taiwan) overseas mission prior to departure to apply for a special entry permit.

4.4. Apart from the criteria for exempted status listed above, R.O.C. (Taiwan) overseas missions may also grant special entry permits when there are clear and urgent reasons for a foreign national to visit Taiwan based on, for example, humanitarian grounds or approval by competent authorities in Taiwan.

4.5. In addition to applying for a special entry permit at an R.O.C. (Taiwan) overseas mission, those requiring special permission to visit Taiwan may also present relevant documents to NIA personnel at the port of entry, who will then make a decision whether to approve entry.

4.6. Cases in which there is any confusion over the interpretation of the aforementioned entry regulations shall be dealt with through coordination by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the NIA. (E)


Frequently Asked Questions (Mar 19)

 

Q1: Do the new border control measures announced by Taiwan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which went into effect on March 19, annul visa-free entry, landing visas, and eVisas for foreign nationals? Can foreign nationals holding a valid visa still enter Taiwan?

A: The border control measures announced by Taiwan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs were implemented in response to the continued spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. Foreign nationals who are eligible for visa-free entry or hold a visitor or resident visa and wish to enter Taiwan from March 19 must hold relevant documents to qualify for exempted status. These documents must be presented to the National Immigration Agency (NIA) personnel at the port of entry for approval. Those holding special entry permits issued by R.O.C. (Taiwan) overseas missions, valid Alien Resident Certificates, or MOFA ID Cards will be allowed entry following inspection by NIA personnel.


Q2: Under what circumstances do foreign nationals qualify for a special entry permit? What are some examples?

A: Apart from the aforementioned foreign nationals who can still enter Taiwan, R.O.C. (Taiwan) overseas missions may also grant special entry permits to foreign nationals when there are clear and urgent reasons for them to visit Taiwan based on, for example, humanitarian grounds or approval by competent authorities in Taiwan.


Q3: Can foreign nationals who have already entered Taiwan extend their visas while in the country? (Updated on June 15)

A:
Please see the link below for MOFA's announcement on June 15.
https://www.boca.gov.tw/cp-220-5667-653c7-2.html

 


Q4: Can foreign spouses and minor children of Taiwan nationals or foreign nationals legally residing in Taiwan still enter the country if they do not have an R.O.C. (Taiwan) Resident Certificate?

A: Such spouses and minor children may apply for a special entry permit with R.O.C. (Taiwan) overseas missions.


Q5: Can foreign nationals apply to competent authorities in Taiwan for an approval letter?

A: Yes, foreign nationals can apply to competent authorities in Taiwan for an approval letter. However, in these cases the reason for visiting Taiwan must be on diplomatic or official business, fulfilling commercial and contractual obligations, or requiring special permission; otherwise, he or she will not be allowed entry.


Q6: If foreign nationals wish to visit Taiwan for nonessential business activities (i.e., any business activity that does not involve fulfilling commercial and contractual obligations), can they still enter the country?

A: Foreign nationals will not be allowed entry unless they show proof that they are visiting Taiwan to fulfill commercial and contractual obligations, or a job acceptance letter or employment contract issued by competent authorities in Taiwan.


Q7: Are foreign migrant workers eligible for special entry permits?

A: Foreign migrant workers holding work permits issued by Taiwan’s Ministry of Labor may enter the country with migrant worker visas issued by R.O.C. (Taiwan) overseas missions.


Q8: Do foreign nationals who are allowed entry into Taiwan still have to comply with relevant quarantine measures?

A: Yes. For more information on quarantine measures, please visit the website of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control: https://www.cdc.gov.tw/

 

 


Mar 18, 2020

CECC raises travel notice for the US, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, including transit flights, to Level 3: Warning; advises against all nonessential travel to these countries

 

On March 18, the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) announced that the global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak has continued to expand. There have been more than 1,000 new cases per day in the United States, with four states experiencing community transmission, and more than 100 new cases per day in Canada and Australia, while New Zealand continues to maintain close ties with Australia. The US and Australia have also declared countrywide or regional states of emergency.
 
Given the risk of infection to Taiwanese nationals, effective March 19 the CECC will raise its travel notice for the US, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, including for transit flights made through these countries, to Level 3: Warning. This comes in addition to the US states of Washington, New York, and California, which were already subject to a Level 3: Warning travel notice. Taiwanese nationals should avoid nonessential travel to these countries, and will be required to follow a 14-day period of home quarantine after returning from Level 3 countries and regions. Furthermore, effective March 19, all inbound travelers will be required to follow a 14-day period of home quarantine after entering Taiwan.
 
As of March 18, the CECC has raised its travel notice for 97 countries and one region to Level 3: Warning; namely, mainland China (including Hong Kong and Macao), 20 Asian countries, nine Central Asian countries, 26 Schengen countries, the United Kingdom, the Republic of Ireland, 14 Eastern European countries, 16 countries and one territory in the Middle East, five north African countries, the US, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia. The Level 3 travel notice also applies to dependent territories of these countries where applicable.
 


Mar 16, 2020

CECC raises travel notice for 20 Asian, East European countries, three US states to Level 3: Warning; advises against all nonessential travel

 

On March 17, the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) reported that the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak has expanded to Asian countries outside China, with more than 10,000 confirmed cases and the number continuing to increase. Numerous countries have declared the outbreak a national emergency and introduced strict border control and quarantine measures. Recently, the epidemic situation in the United States has also escalated. Considering the increased risk of infection, the CECC announced that effective March 19, it will raise its travel notice for 19 countries in Asia, one country in Eastern Europe, and three states in the US to Level 3: Warning. This comes in addition to China (including Hong Kong and Macao), South Korea, and Central Asian countries, which are already subject to a Level 3: Warning travel notice.

The countries and US states covered by this announcement are as follows:

  • Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, East Timor, India, Indonesia, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, North Korea, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam
  • Eastern Europe: Moldova
  • US states: California, New York, and Washington

The CECC has advised that all nonessential travel to the countries and areas listed above be avoided. Starting at 16:00, March 17, Taiwan time, travelers already on a flight from any of these countries or areas to Taiwan must observe a 14-day period of self-health management after entering Taiwan, while those boarding a flight after that time will be required to undergo a 14-day period of home quarantine.

While only the above three US states have been listed at Level 3: Warning, the CECC has raised the travel notice for all other US states to Level 2: Alert. Travelers to Level 2 states are advised to take strong precautionary measures and will be required to observe a 14-day period of self-health management upon returning to Taiwan.

 


Mar 16, 2020

CECC raises travel notice for 42 countries and one territory in Eastern Europe, Middle East, Central Asia, and Northern Africa to Level 3: Warning; CECC advises against all nonessential travel

 

On March 16, the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) reported that the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak had expanded throughout Eastern Europe and the Middle East, and announced that effective March 17, it will raise its travel notice for 13 countries in Eastern Europe, 15 countries and one territory in the Middle East, five countries in Northern Africa, and nine countries in Central Asia to Level 3: Warning. This comes in addition to the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Iran, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia, which were already subject to a Level 3: Warning travel notice.

The countries and territory covered by this announcement are as follows: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Egypt, Georgia, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, North Macedonia, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, and Yemen. Travelers from these countries will be required to follow a 14-day period of home quarantine after entering Taiwan.

 


Mar 14, 2020

Starting 2 pm of March 14, travelers yet on board leaving 27 European countries or Dubai are required to practice a 14-day home quarantine after entering Taiwan


The Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) announced on March 14 that, considering the frequent movement of citizens in the Schengen Area, it will raise the travel notice on March 17, to Level 3: Warning, for all Schengen countries including France, Germany, Spain, Portugal, Austria, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Slovakia, Slovenia, Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Greece, Malta, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein, in addition to Italy, which is already on Level 3. The United Kingdom and Ireland, enjoying free movement in the Area, are also now on Level 3. Dubai (transits included) is also on the list. People are advised to avoid nonessential travel to these countries. Starting form 2pm, March 14, those already on board are asked to practice more stringent self-health management, whereas travelers yet on board will have to follow a 14-day home quarantine. Staring from March 17, foreign travelers required to follow home quarantine can pay to stay at the group quarantine facilities if they do not have other places to reside in.

The disease outbreak in the US has intensified, with 46 states and Washington D.C. all reporting confirmed cases, and more than 20 states having declared a state of emergency. According to the assessment of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC), coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is spread through communities in the states of Washington, New York and California. Isolation measures have been implemented in certain regions suffering from severe epidemic developments. In light of the situation, the CECC raised its travel notice for the above three states to level 2: Alert. Travelers visiting these regions are advised to practice enhanced precautions. The travel notice for remaining US states is Level 1: Watch, and visitors are advised to take usual precautionary measures.

The World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a pandemic, with more than 110 countries reporting confirmed cases and more than 70 countries reporting indigenous transmissions. Various countries have strengthened its border control measures and restricted the movement of people. As infections continue to spread globally, and considering the close transportations and exchange between nations, the CECC raised its travel notice to Level 1: Watch, for all countries yet listed in the advisory. Travelers who have visited countries listed in the Level 1 and 2 categories in the past 14 days are required to practice a 14-day self-health management. As travel notice are heightened for countries around the globe, the government will strengthen its border control measures and conduct retrospective screenings to ensure the safety of Taiwan people.

 


Mar 1, 2020

CECC raises travel notice level for Iran to Level 3: Warning, advises against all non-essential travel


On March 1, 2020, the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) reported that the number of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases in Iran has risen sharply, and based on the risk of COVID-19 infection, the CECC has raised its travel notice level for Iran to Level 3: Warning, and advises the public to avoid all non-essential travel to Iran. In addition, starting from March 2, travelers who have traveled to Iran in the past 14 days (transits not included) are required to follow a 14-day home quarantine after entering Taiwan.

As the COVID-19 epidemic continues to expand internationally, the CECC has listed China (including Hong Kong and Macau), South Korea, and Italy and Iran under travel notice Level 3: Warning; Japan and Singapore under Level 2: Alert; and Thailand under Level 1: Watch. The CECC will continue to closely monitor the developments of the epidemic and adjust its disease prevention strategy and travel notices for countries as the situation requires.

 


Feb 27, 2020

CECC raises travel notice for Italy to Level 3: Warning; travelers arriving from Italy subject to home quarantine

On February 27, 2020, the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) announced that it has raised the travel notice for Italy to Level 3: Warning, in the wake of the rapid increase in the number of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases in the country. Given the increased risk of infection, the CECC has also advised against all nonessential travel to Italy. Furthermore, starting from February 28, travelers arriving from Italy (except for passengers who transit through Italy) will be required to observe home quarantine for 14 days.

In response to the international spread of COVID-19, the CECC has listed China (including Hong Kong and Macao), South Korea, and Italy under travel notice Level 3: Warning; Japan, Singapore, and Iran under Level 2: Alert; and Thailand under Level 1: Watch. The CECC will continue to closely monitor outbreak developments and adjust its prevention strategy and travel notices as the situation requires.

 


Feb. 24, 2020

CECC raises travel notice level for South Korea to Level 3: Warning

1. The number of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases in South Korea has risen sharply, with large clusters of infections at a church and in hospitals fueling the outbreak by community transmission. The city of Daegu and Cheongdo County in North Gyeongsang Province have been designated special management zones. Based on the risk of COVID-19 infection, the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) has raised its travel notice level to Level 3: Warning, and advises the public to avoid all unnecessary travel to South Korea.

2. Starting from February 25, foreign nationals entering Taiwan from South Korea (except for passengers who transit through South Korea) must undergo a 14-day period of home quarantine; starting from February 25 until the end of February 26, Taiwanese nationals entering Taiwan from South Korea must undergo a 14-day period of self-health management; and starting from February 27, Taiwanese nationals entering Taiwan from South Korea must undergo a 14-day period of home quarantine.

 


Feb. 7, 2020

Starting February 10, 14-day home quarantine to be required for travelers transiting through China, Hong Kong and Macau and granted entry into Taiwan; restrictions on direct flights to and from China, Hong Kong and Macau to be implemented and flights from certain airports to be suspended

 As the recent cumulative total of confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) infection in China is rapidly growing, the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) announced the following instruction:
Starting from 0:00 am of February 10, 2020, travelers who transit through China, Hong Kong and Macau and are granted entry into Taiwan and will be required to be under home quarantine for 14 days.

Pursuant to the request proposed by the Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taiwan for disease prevention, the Ministry of Transportation and Communications will impose a temporary ban on cross-strait passenger flights between Taiwan and certain airports in China starting 0:00 am of February 10 to 11:59 pm of April 29. Except for the flights to and from Beijing Capital International Airport, Shanghai Pudong International Airport, Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport, Xiamen Gaoqi International Airport and Chengdu Shuangliu International Airport, cross-strait flights to and from the remaining airports in China will be suspended.

 


Feb. 6, 2020

Starting February 7, 2020, the Republic of China (Taiwan) will implement a temporary measure prohibiting foreign nationals who in the previous 14 days have visited or resided in the People’s Republic of China (PRC), including Hong Kong and Macao, from entering Taiwan

1. In view of the fact that the Taiwan government on February 5 designated all areas of the PRC (including Hong Kong and Macao) as being severely affected by the novel coronavirus outbreak (areas of level 2 or higher), foreign nationals who have visited or resided anywhere in the PRC, including Hong Kong and Macao, in the previous 14 days will be temporarily prohibited from entering Taiwan starting February 7. Entry visa applications by such foreign nationals, including those submitted for special reasons, will not be accepted by Taiwan’s overseas missions while this temporary measure is in effect.

2. Foreign nationals possessing a valid Taiwan Resident Certificate who have visited or resided anywhere in the PRC, including Hong Kong and Macao, in the previous 14 days shall self-isolate at their home after returning to Taiwan and be under home quarantine for a period of 14 days.

3. The aforementioned measures will officially take effect on February 7, and may be adjusted based on the development of the novel coronavirus outbreak.

 


Frequently Asked Questions (Feb 7)

I.  Visas and residency

Q1:
If foreign nationals have entered or resided in the People’s Republic of China, including Hong Kong and Macao, within the past 14 days, and are eligible for visa-free, landing visa, or e-visa treatment, or are in possession of a valid visa, are they still barred from entry into the Republic of China (Taiwan)?

A:
They are barred. Any foreign national who has entered or resided anywhere in the PRC, including Hong Kong and Macao, within the past 14 days may not enter the Republic of China (Taiwan) even if eligible for visa-free, landing visa, or e-visa treatment or if in possession of a valid visa.


Q2: 
If foreign nationals have entered or resided in the PRC, including Hong Kong and Macao, over the past 14 days but have a special reason to enter Taiwan, may they apply at ROC missions abroad for a visa?

A:
They may not. The Central Epidemic Command Center has announced that from February 6, all areas of the PRC, including Hong Kong and Macao, are listed as being severely affected by the novel coronavirus outbreak (areas of level 2 or higher). Thus, even where special circumstances exist, ROC missions abroad will not accept visa applications for anyone having entered or resided anywhere in the PRC, including Hong Kong and Macao, within the last 14 days.


Q3:
May foreign nationals in possession of a valid Taiwan Resident Certificate who have entered or resided in the PRC, including Hong Kong and Macao, over the past 14 days return to Taiwan?

A:
They may. However, as all areas of the PRC are now designated level 2 or higher—severely affected by the novel coronavirus outbreak—anyone who has entered or resided in the PRC, including Hong Kong and Macao, shall, after passing through immigration, abide by the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) Measures for Following Up on Persons at Risk of Infection and self-quarantine at home for 14 days.


II.  Immigration and inspection

Q4:
How is the 14-day window calculated with respect to these entry restrictions?

A:
The 14-day window refers to the 14 days prior to entering Taiwan. For instance, if one were to enter Taiwan on February 15, the 14-day window would extend from February 1 to February 14.


Q5:
How will the government determine whether or not a foreigner has visited the PRC, including Hong Kong and Macao, in the past 14 days?

A:
This will be determined based on the foreign traveler’s passport entry/exit stamps or airplane/ship ticket(s) from the previous trip(s).


Q6:
May ROC citizens who possess dual citizenship and have entered or resided anywhere in the PRC, including Hong Kong and Macao, in the past 14 days enter Taiwan using a foreign passport?

A:
No. Foreign passport holders who have entered or resided anywhere in the PRC, including Hong Kong and Macao, in the past 14 days and do not possess a valid Taiwan Resident Certificate may not enter Taiwan.


Q7:
Will foreign travelers be stopped from entering Taiwan and deported at the airport if they have entered or resided anywhere in the PRC, including Hong Kong and Macao, in the past 14 days? And if the airlines mistakenly allowed them to take their flight, or the travelers were unaware of the current restrictions, will such foreign travelers be allowed to travel to a third location? 

A:
All foreigners failing to abide by related ROC (Taiwan) regulations shall be deported to the country from which they arrived. They may be deported to a third location depending on airline arrangements and their own eligibility.


III. Other questions

Q8:
Were these measures based on those of another country? If not, what standards were used in their formulation? 

A:
When formulating these regulations, epidemic information released by the World Health Organization and the border control measures taken by European countries, the United States, and neighboring countries were taken into consideration. These regulations may be adjusted as the situation evolves.


Q9:
How will foreigners traveling to Taiwan be notified about these regulations? Where can the latest updates be found? If foreigners have related questions, what telephone numbers can be used to obtain information? 

A:
1.  The latest updates on visa and border control measures will be announced on the websites of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Bureau of Consular Affairs, and ROC missions abroad.

2. For questions about the coronavirus, callers in Taiwan may use the 1922 hotline to obtain information. For questions about visa and border control regulations, callers may use the following numbers to obtain information (callers from abroad should add 866 to the number and not include 0 in front of the 2):
(02) 2343-2921(02) 2343-2895(02) 2343-2850(02) 2343-2876, and (02) 2343-2900.


Q10:    
Should the current situation worsen, will further steps be taken regarding foreigners traveling to Taiwan? 

A:
The related regulations will be adjusted as the situation evolves. Should the coronavirus outbreak worsen, the government will take whatever border control measures necessary regarding the countries in question.


  • Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak important updates related to Taiwan - Ministry of Foreign Affairs 【Please Click Here】

  • CECC Measures for Following Up on Persons at Risk of Infection (home isolation, home quarantine, and self-health management) 【Download】 (latest update by CECC: 2020/03/19 )

  • CDC “Regulations concerning short-term business travelers’ applications for shortened quarantine periods in Taiwan”【Please Click Here】


 

 

Latest update: 2020/07/24

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